PIP choice would be a ‘solution’ that actually creates new problems, by reducing care and shifting costs from insurance companies to taxpayers

CPAN: PIP choice would be a ‘solution’ that actually creates new problems, by reducing care and shifting costs from insurance companies to taxpayers

John Cornack, president of the Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault (CPAN), issued the following statement in response to today’s Senate Insurance and Banking Committee hearing. The hearing focused on dismantling Michigan’s no-fault auto insurance system and replacing it with Personal Injury Protection (PIP) choice, which would allow insurance companies to sell junk plans with no guaranteed rate reduction.

“There are two fundamental problems with so-called PIP choice. First, it will deprive Michigan citizens of essential care. PIP choice means families will go bankrupt because they can’t pay their medical bills, and catastrophically injured children won’t receive the care they need. That’s unacceptable.

“Second, implementing PIP choice would likely result in a hidden tax increase on all Michigan citizens, as catastrophically injured drivers would have to declare medical bankruptcy and end up on state Medicaid. In fact, the nonpartisan House Fiscal Agency in 2017 found that a PIP choice plan would shift $150 million in costs to the Medicaid system. That’s a good deal for insurance companies and a bad deal for everyone else. As Gov. Whitmer said in her State of the State address last night, we should reject ‘solutions’ that actually create new problems.

“There’s a better way to lower rates – through effective rate regulation, prohibiting the use of non-driving rating factors when setting rates, implementing a fee schedule for health care providers, cracking down on fraud, and enacting other common-sense, bipartisan reforms.”


CPAN: Lack of consumer protections in Michigan is what’s truly ‘shameful’

CPAN: Lack of consumer protections in Michigan is what’s truly ‘shameful’

DETROIT—(Feb. 7, 2019)—The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan today heard a motion filed by the state of Michigan seeking to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the City of Detroit which sought a declaration that the Michigan no-fault statute was unconstitutional and should be invalidated. The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault filed a motion several months ago seeking permission to intervene in this lawsuit for the purpose of preserving Michigan’s auto no-fault law from being declared void.

At today’s hearing, Judge George C. Steeh ruled that he would take the state’s motion to dismiss the City of Detroit lawsuit under advisement in order to give state legislators and state officials opportunity to correct deficiencies that he declared had resulted in a “shameful situation.”  The court did not rule on CPAN’s motion to intervene, nor did it address other intervention requests.

Although CPAN, in its intervention pleadings, agreed with the City of Detroit that Michigan motorists have a constitutional right to auto no-fault insurance at “fair and equitable rates,” as mandated by the landmark 1978 decision of the Michigan Supreme Court in Shavers vs. Attorney General, CPAN vehemently disagrees with the position of the City of Detroit that the proper remedy is a judicial declaration that the law is invalid. Rather, CPAN takes the position that there are a number of things that could have been done and were not done over the years by state government – in particular, the Department of Financial and Insurance Services – to keep auto no-fault affordable.

CPAN General Counsel George T. Sinas commented on the situation, stating:

“What is shameful is that the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) has done virtually nothing significant in the last 25 years to make sure that auto insurance rates were affordable for the average citizen. For example, it has failed to properly implement a statutory provision requiring the department director to make a specific determination that premiums for coordinated benefit policies had been “appropriately reduced;” it has failed to implement the decision of the Michigan Supreme Court in Shavers vs Attorney General by formulating standards to ensure that premiums were “fair and equitable;” it has failed to exercise its authority to obtain certain ratemaking data from the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association that would verify whether the annual MCCA assessments were appropriate; and it has failed to exercise its authority under the Uniform Trade Practices Act that gives the department authority to issue refunds if it finds that insurance companies are engaging in “unfair” practices.

These failures by the bureau are even more reprehensible given recently disclosed evidence that insurers are engaging in unfair ratemaking practices that result in higher rates being paid by women, widows, blue-collar workers, non-homeowners, economic profiling and others. Furthermore, this abdication of responsibility further confirms that in reality DIFS has largely been a rubber stamp protector of the insurance industry.

If anything is shameful, it is that legacy of neglect. There is little doubt that had DIFS done its job, we all would have been paying lower rates.

The question that becomes: who’s going to make DIFS do what it’s supposed to do?”

CPAN is hopeful that the federal court will grant its petition to intervene as it has become obvious that this federal lawsuit will be a major factor in shaping the future of auto no-fault in Michigan.


CPAN welcomes new DIFS Director Fox, calls for new era of stronger consumer protections and regulation of insurance industry

CPAN welcomes new DIFS Director Fox, calls for new era of stronger consumer protections and regulation of insurance industry

FOIA records show former Director McPharlin was too cozy with insurance companies

LANSING, Mich.—(Jan. 14, 2019)—The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault today welcomed Anita Fox into her new role as director of the Department of Insurance and Financial Services, and called on her to reform the department into one that protects the interests of consumers rather than the insurance industry.

Today, Fox officially replaces outgoing director Patrick McPharlin, who had a cozy and secretive relationship with the industry he was supposed to be policing, according to records obtained by CPAN through the Freedom of Information Act.

“CPAN looks forward to working with Director Fox to make auto insurance more affordable while protecting the benefits that catastrophically injured auto accident victims need to lead productive, meaningful lives,” said John Cornack, president of CPAN. “For too long, no one has held Michigan’s insurance companies accountable. Michigan consumers need a bulldog in state government to protect them from the insurance industry’s discriminatory practices – instead, Patrick McPharlin was a lap dog for the big insurance companies.”

Documents that CPAN recently obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request relate to the DIFS “President’s Council” – a group of insurance company CEOs who regularly met with McPharlin. Only emails and meeting agendas were made available through the FOIA – no minutes of President’s Council meetings exist, although it’s clear that issues relevant to the public were discussed.

For example, an agenda item for Jan. 28, 2016 was titled “Make Michigan theinsurance industry state.” In letters sent to each insurance company CEO invited to sit on the Council, McPharlin said he wanted to hear about “laws we need to enact, repeal, or modify” to make the CEOs happy.

In a letter to State Rep. Donna Lasinski, McPharlin confirmed that the issue of tax reform was discussed at one of the President’s Council meetings. CPAN, Rep. Lasinski and other consumer advocates in the Michigan Legislature have called on DIFS to take a more proactive approach in ensuring that the insurance industry pass along to consumers the massive windfall they received as part of federal tax reform enacted in 2017. While no minutes exist from the meeting, DIFS clearly opted not to crack down on insurance companies, which have continued to rake in huge profits while jacking up prices on consumers. For example, during the first nine months of 2018, Allstate, ranked in the top 5 for market share in Michigan, increased its Adjusted Net Income by $716 million over the same time period in 2017.

Cornack noted that a recent poll commissioned by CPAN found that 65 percent of respondents said auto insurance rates are high because the State of Michigan does a poor job regulating rates to protect consumers.

“With stronger oversight from state government and a new opportunity for bipartisan solutions in the Legislature, we hope that 2019 will represent a new era—one where we put the needs of consumers above the profits of big insurance companies,” he said. “We are encouraged that we can work together to find a solution that lowers insurance premiums while protecting benefits for all Michigan drivers and families.”


CPAN welcomes new DIFS Director Fox, calls for new era of stronger consumer protections and regulation of insurance industry

CPAN welcomes new DIFS Director Fox, calls for new era of stronger consumer protections and regulation of insurance industry

FOIA records show former Director McPharlin was too cozy with insurance companies

LANSING, Mich.—(Jan. 14, 2019)—The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault today welcomed Anita Fox into her new role as director of the Department of Insurance and Financial Services, and called on her to reform the department into one that protects the interests of consumers rather than the insurance industry.

Today, Fox officially replaces outgoing director Patrick McPharlin, who had a cozy and secretive relationship with the industry he was supposed to be policing, according to records obtained by CPAN through the Freedom of Information Act.

“CPAN looks forward to working with Director Fox to make auto insurance more affordable while protecting the benefits that catastrophically injured auto accident victims need to lead productive, meaningful lives,” said John Cornack, president of CPAN. “For too long, no one has held Michigan’s insurance companies accountable. Michigan consumers need a bulldog in state government to protect them from the insurance industry’s discriminatory practices – instead, Patrick McPharlin was a lap dog for the big insurance companies.”

Documents that CPAN recently obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request relate to the DIFS “President’s Council” – a group of insurance company CEOs who regularly met with McPharlin. Only emails and meeting agendas were made available through the FOIA – no minutes of President’s Council meetings exist, although it’s clear that issues relevant to the public were discussed.

For example, an agenda item for Jan. 28, 2016 was titled “Make Michigan theinsurance industry state.” In letters sent to each insurance company CEO invited to sit on the Council, McPharlin said he wanted to hear about “laws we need to enact, repeal, or modify” to make the CEOs happy.

In a letter to State Rep. Donna Lasinski, McPharlin confirmed that the issue of tax reform was discussed at one of the President’s Council meetings. CPAN, Rep. Lasinski and other consumer advocates in the Michigan Legislature have called on DIFS to take a more proactive approach in ensuring that the insurance industry pass along to consumers the massive windfall they received as part of federal tax reform enacted in 2017. While no minutes exist from the meeting, DIFS clearly opted not to crack down on insurance companies, which have continued to rake in huge profits while jacking up prices on consumers. For example, during the first nine months of 2018, Allstate, ranked in the top 5 for market share in Michigan, increased its Adjusted Net Income by $716 million over the same time period in 2017.

Cornack noted that a recent poll commissioned by CPAN found that 65 percent of respondents said auto insurance rates are high because the State of Michigan does a poor job regulating rates to protect consumers.

“With stronger oversight from state government and a new opportunity for bipartisan solutions in the Legislature, we hope that 2019 will represent a new era—one where we put the needs of consumers above the profits of big insurance companies,” he said. “We are encouraged that we can work together to find a solution that lowers insurance premiums while protecting benefits for all Michigan drivers and families.”



SB 1014 (H-1) 10 Reasons to Just Say “NO“

SB 1014 (H-1)
10 Reasons to Just Say “NO”

On November 3, 2017, the Michigan House of Representatives rejected HB 5013, which would have allowed insurance companies to sell substandard auto no-fault insurance policies to Michigan families with woefully inadequate caps on medical care and income loss benefits for auto accident injuries. Now, SB 1014 (H-1) seeks to authorize the sale of very similar substandard, capped no-fault insurance policies. Contrary to some characterizations, the first capped option under the SB 1014 (H-1) is not a $250,000 cap. Rather, it is a $25,000 lifetime cap with a narrow exception for $225,000 in emergency medical care. The second capped option is a $250,000 cap, with no distinction between emergency medical care and non-emergency care. The third capped option is a $500,000 cap, with no distinction between emergency medical care and non-emergency care. Importantly, these three capped options apply not only to medical expenses, but to all PIP benefits, including benefits for income loss and household services. These inadequate benefit caps are applicable to all family members in a household who are covered by the policy. Moreover, the bill authorizes the sale of these substandard no-fault policies with no true guarantee of insurance premium reductions. The bill also provides many loopholes for insurance companies to avoid charging fair insurance rates to Michigan consumers. For the same reasons that HB 5013 was rejected as horrible policy for Michigan, SB 1014(H-1) must also be rejected. The following provides at least 10 compelling reasons to just say“NO” to this bill.

1. Every Child Can be Left Behind – Under current law, every Michigan child is entitled to lifetime medical coverage for auto accident injuries. Under the bill, every child loses this existing right to lifetime medical coverage forauto accident injuries, if the child’s parent does not buy or cannot afford to buylifetime coverage and instead buys a capped no-fault policy. Children in those households will not have the lifetime medical and rehabilitation coverage that is essential for a child dealing with the lifelong consequences of catastrophic injury.

2. Bad Choices for Senior Citizens – The bill purports to give senior citizens a choice to save premium dollars by entirely opting out of no-fault PIP coverage. In reality, this is a bad choice for Michigan seniors. Seniors are not given the choice to retain the part of no-fault coverage that makes it possible for them to stay in their home if they sustain severe, disabling injuries in an auto accident. The bill provides an “all-or-nothing” choice for seniors with no specific, substantial, and guaranteed premium reduction for making such a bad choice. A truly fair senior citizen opt-out is one that allows seniors to opt-out of no-fault coverage to the extent medical expenses are covered by other health plans, while retaining no-fault coverage for those expenses that are not.

3. Reprehensible Protections for Drunk and Careless Drivers – Those irresponsible drivers who cause victims to incur medical expenses beyond a capped no-fault PIP policy will be immune and have absolutely no liability for compensating the victim for those uncovered medical expenses. This injustice does not exist under the current no-fault system because all accident victims have lifetime medical coverage and do not incur uncovered medical expenses.

4. Drastic Reduction of Family-Provided Attendant Care Benefits – Catastrophically injured patients will lose 50% of their right to family- provided attendant care benefits, which will now be limited to only 12 hours per day. For the remaining care, families will be required to hire strangers to care for them in their home.

5. Increased Risk for Patient Bankruptcy and Taxpayer Liability – Seriously injured persons with capped no-fault policies who incur substantial medical expenses in excess of that cap will likely face financial disaster because of these uncovered expenses. For many, this will mean bankruptcy. The auto accident related medical expenses that will no longer be covered will be shifted to Michigan taxpayers through increased financial burdens in the Medicaid system.

6. Inadequate Medical Fee Schedules Resulting in Cost Shifting – Under the bill, providers treating auto accident victims will be only compensated at rates payable under the Michigan Workers’ Compensation fee schedule. These substantially lower rates will cause a disincentive for the best medical providers to render care to auto accident victims and will cause the unreimbursed portion of medical care to be shifted to other health care payment systems, including employer-provided health insurance and other insurance plans.

7. Phony Protection from Unfair Rate-Making Practices – Although the bill purports to prohibit rate-making practices based upon gender, marital status, education, etc., it will allow those very same practices to be utilized if a no-fault insurer files group insurance rates. Various insurance companies are currently exploiting this loophole, which this bill does not close. Moreover, the bill does not prohibit the use of a person’s credit history, it only bars use of the “credit score” (the specific number assigned by the credit reporting agency). Because of this, insurers will still be allowed to use credit history, zip codes, and other data tracked by the credit scoring companies. This section offers only illusory protection from unfair rate-making practices.

8. Phony Premium Reductions – The bill purports to mandate a reduction in premiums. However, this premium reduction is illusory for two reasons: a) the premium reduction required by the bill applies only to the premium for PIP benefits, not to the total premium, which, in reality, is comprised of coverages that are frequently more costly than the premium for PIP benefits; and b) under the bill, no premium reduction is necessary if an insurance company is able to convince the Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) that the failure to reduce the premium is “justified” by “using generally accepted and reasonable actuarial techniques.”

9. Phony MCCA Transparency – Even though the bill requires an independent audit of the MCCA, it does not require the disclosure of the MCCA’s“rate-making data,” which is essential to determining the appropriateness of the MCCA annual assessment that is passed onto Michigan drivers.

10. Economic Disaster for the Michigan Health Care Economy – Michigan’s healthcare economy is robust and essential to the overall economic health of Michigan. This bill, which eliminates lifetime coverage for auto accident injuries and drastically reduces medical provider reimbursement rates, will significantly diminish revenue to that sector of Michigan’s economy, thereby precipitating a loss of jobs and an impairment of Michigan’s economic growth.

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For more information about the legal implications of this Bill, please contact the CPAN Legal Team of George T. Sinas, Stephen H. Sinas, or Thomas G. Sinas, of the Sinas Dramis Law Firm in Lansing and Grand Rapids. Those telephone numbers are: Lansing Office at (517) 394-7500 and Grand Rapids Office at (616) 301-3333.


CPAN joins bipartisan lawmakers in calling on state government to crack down on insurance industry’s refusal to lower rates in light of corporate tax reform

CPAN joins bipartisan lawmakers in calling on state government to crack down on insurance industry’s refusal to lower rates in light of corporate tax reform

Lawmakers question why corporate savings not passed down to consumers

LANSING – The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault today joined with a bipartisan group of Michigan legislators calling on the state Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) to ensure that insurance companies pass along the savings they received from the federal tax reform enacted last December.

CPAN President John Cornack expressed his support for a letter sent to DIFS Director Patrick McPharlin, submitted by State Rep. Donna Lasinski and co-signed by several Michigan legislators. The letter notes that “if insurers have not adjusted their rates to account for the lower tax, their rates likely became excessive, leaving Michigan residents overpaying for auto, home, and renters coverage they need.”

“Rep. Lasinski is absolutely correct – the insurance industry received a massive tax break as part of federal tax reform, but instead of passing that relief onto consumers, it appears that they’ve once again opted to line their own pockets,” Cornack said. “For too long, state government has looked the other way while the insurance industry has bled residents dry. It’s time for DIFS to stand up to insurers and protect Michigan consumers. All lawmakers fighting to lower auto insurance rates for Michigan drivers should be compelling DIFS to take action.”

In January 2018, the Consumer Federation of America (CFA) sent a letter to McPharlin and state insurance commissioners throughout the country, asking what actions the industry would be taking to reduce rates to reflect the windfall from tax changes and to ensure rates return to reasonable levels.

In her follow-up letter to Director McPharlin, Rep. Lasinski writes: “As we understand it, neither you nor your staff responded to CFA’s query. More important than your lack of response to the CFA, however, is the apparent lack of response to the underlying problem. We are not aware of any systematic DIFS effort to ensure that insurance companies have appropriately reduced their rates in response to changes in federal tax law.”

Instead, insurance companies continue to rake in huge profits while jacking up prices on consumers. During the first nine months of 2018, Allstate, ranked in the top 5 for market share in Michigan, increased its Adjusted Net Income by $716 million over the same time period in 2017, which, Allstate explains, was “driven by higher premiums earned, lower catastrophe losses and a lower effective tax rate…” Meanwhile, Allstate customers saw a total premium increase of $331 million between January 2018 and September 2018 alone.

Douglas Heller, an insurance industry expert who has worked with CPAN to uncover the insurance industry’s discriminatory practice of using factors like gender, job title and ZIP code when setting rates in Michigan, said that the profit provision of an insurance rate filing incorporates anticipated taxes, so the corporate tax cut would allow for a lower rate filing while providing insurers with the same rate of return. Heller noted that earlier this year the California Insurance Commissioner directed his Department’s staff “to commence a regulatory review of these insurers’ rates given the major tax windfall under the new federal tax rules” and also issued a notice to all insurers stating that “any insurer with excessive rates, whether in whole or in part due to…changes to the federal income tax rates or due to any other reason, must file a rate change application with the Department to seek an appropriate insurance rate reduction.”

“Consumers Energy and DTE along with many utilities—another regulated industry—announced plans to cut rates due to their tax reform windfall, and insurance companies should be doing the same,” Heller said. “Michigan’s lack of effective oversight of these insurance companies is the main driver of the too-high auto insurance rates paid by policyholders. Requiring stronger regulation is the best way to provide relief to consumers.”

 


New poll reveals majority of Michigan residents support protecting auto no- fault benefits, cracking down on insurance companies’ discriminatory practices

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New poll reveals majority of Michigan residents support protecting auto no- fault benefits, cracking down on insurance companies’ discriminatory practices

Survey also finds support for bipartisan Fair and Affordable no-fault reform package, which remains largely neglected in the Michigan Legislature

GROSSE POINTE, Mich. — Two-thirds of Michigan residents support a package of bills in the Michigan Legislature that seeks to lower auto insurance premiums while protecting the lifetime medical and lost-wage benefits provided by the state’s auto no-fault insurance system, according to a new statewide poll conducted by ROI Insight.

The poll showed strong support for the benefits provided by the no-fault system. Sixty-five percent of likely voters (56 percent strongly) reject any plan to eliminate or limit medical benefits for auto accident victims. Meanwhile, 56 percent believe rates should not be slashed at the expense of accident victims.

In addition, 77 percent of respondents said they do not believe insurance companies when they say they want to save them money, and 65 percent of respondents said rates are high because the State of Michigan does a poor job regulating rates to protect consumers.

“Voters strongly want to protect the lifetime medical benefits and limited lost wage benefits that no-fault provides,” said Paul King, president of ROI Insight. “When voters discuss the protections provided by the no-fault system, the polling data show their perceptions are significantly positive. In fact, nearly three-quarters of voters say no-fault’s protections of lifetime medical benefits to accident victims are good things, with a plurality saying ‘very good.’”

The statewide survey of 800 likely voters, which was conducted by live callers between Sept. 15 and 20, included a 30-percent mix of cell phone users. The margin of error was +/-3.46. The survey was commissioned by CPAN (Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault), a coalition of consumer groups and care providers working in a bipartisan way to reduce premiums while protecting Michigan drivers and families.

The bipartisan Fair and Affordable package of bills, which has sat in the Michigan Legislature for over a year without receiving a hearing, includes bills which would end the insurance industry’s discriminatory practices of using non-driving rating factors like gender and ZIP code when setting rates; require more transparency in how rates are set; crack down on fraud by insurance companies, consumers and medical providers; and lower health care costs by establishing a fee schedule for medical providers.

This survey shows that the Fair and Affordable package is supported by 66 percent of likely Michigan voters.

 

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View the full version of the release here.

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About ROI Insight

ROI Insight was founded by Paul King, an award-winning researcher and strategist with more than 25 years in the market research and public opinion polling field. Based in Grosse Pointe, Mich., ROI Insight helps clients measure and influence public opinions and audience motivators by providing research and consulting services to stakeholders across various business sectors as well as the non-profit and public affairs vertical markets.

 


CPAN earns awards for excellence from Michigan Society of Association Executives (MSAE)

CPAN earns awards for excellence from Michigan Society of Association Executives (MSAE)

Lansing – The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault (CPAN) earned multiple honors as the Michigan Society of Association Executives (MSAE) saluted the innovation of program winners at its 17th annual Diamond Awards event Sept. 20th in Novi.

In the “Public Relations Campaign” category, CPAN received a Diamond Award for its campaign “Non-driving Rating Factors: Game Changer in No-Fault Battle” (Less than $1 million budget category). In the “Social Media Campaign” category, CPAN earned a Diamond Award for its campaign “Michigan Drivers Save with Shop Your Policy” (less than $1 million budget).

“We’re enormously proud of the work CPAN has done over the past year to protect benefits for victims of catastrophic automobile accidents while helping consumers secure lower auto insurance premiums,” said Martha Levandowski, administrative director of CPAN. “These awards are a testament to the dedication and hard work of our team, which is so passionate about what we do. We look forward to continuing to advocate for Michigan drivers and families.”

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CPAN is a broad coalition of health care providers, patient advocates and accident survivors who are committed to preserving Michigan’s model auto no-fault insurance system. For more information, please visit www.ProtectNoFault.org.

MSAE, based in East Lansing, is a professional organization of more than 1,600 members that works to advance knowledge in the association industry.  More than 300 association professionals gathered Sept. 20th at Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi to recognize leaders and program excellence.


CPAN Statement: Duggan lawsuit against State of Michigan points blame in the wrong direction, won’t guarantee lower auto insurance premiums

Cornack: Action needed to hold insurance companies accountable

Lansing — Today, Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced a lawsuit against the State of Michigan with a political aim of dismantling Michigan’s auto no-fault system, which would adversely affect citizens across Michigan. Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault (CPAN) President John Cornack issued the following statement in response to the proposed lawsuit:

“Instead of holding insurance companies accountable for their discriminatory rate-setting practices and sky-high premiums, Mayor Duggan is once again blaming a law that has been a lifesaver for thousands of Michigan families over the last five decades.

“While we have not had the opportunity to review and analyze this filing, this issue of affordability and auto insurance is critical because it impacts every Michigan citizen. CPAN is deeply concerned about the lawsuit that aims to make sweeping and potentially devastating changes to Michigan’s auto no-fault law, a move that will allow insurance companies to sell worse plans with no guaranteed reduction in rates. This lawsuit is primarily a political stunt. Our courts are not charged with writing legislation, but upholding the law.

“CPAN agrees that under the landmark Michigan Supreme Court decision in Shavers v Attorney General that Michigan citizens have a constitutional right to fair and equitable auto insurance rates. However, we believe the proper remedy when that right is being violated is to enact legislation forcing insurance companies to utilize fair and equitable rate making procedures so that premiums are affordable for all Michigan citizens. The bipartisan, Fair and Affordable package of bills that will lower rates without threatening benefits, has been introduced in the Michigan Legislature. This bill package is stalled and has yet to receive consideration by House Committee Chair, Rep Lana Theis nor the House Leadership.It’s time to pass this package of bills and hold the insurance companies accountable.”

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The Coalition Protecting Auto No-Fault (CPAN) is a broad-based coalition of organizations representing consumer advocacy groups and health care professionals of all political persuasions. These organizations are united to preserve Michigan’s model no-fault auto insurance system and to make sure that the Michigan auto insurance industry kept the original no-fault promise it made to Michigan citizens when the No-Fault Act was passed in 1972.